Enhancing teacher learning from guided video analysis

Hong, C. E., & Van Riper, I. (2016).  Enhancing teacher learning from guided video analysis of literacy instruction:  An interdisciplinary and collaborative approach.

Journal of Inquiry & Action in Education, 7(2), 94-110.

Using videos in education is a prominent practice and has been for many decades already.  Using them for promoting growth in pre-service teachers for the understanding of teaching techniques is a newer field.  Many studies now “document the use of videos for teacher development, [but] teachers’ analysis of their own videos or others is not considered a routinized practice in teacher education programs” (Hong & Van Riper, 2016, p. 94).  The edTPA program has affected views on that.  Because the students’ videos are critiqued by nationally trained specialists, the scores are valid.  Teacher colleges ought, then, to teach their candidates to evaluate themselves on video, and then collaborate with peers and instructors to check their own analyses (Hong & Van Riper, 2016). The studies that have been done on this process “are consistent, suggesting that video-recorded lessons facilitate teacher learning, challenge teachers’ existing knowledge and skills, and enable teachers to reflect on their instruction in order to make changes and positively impact the learning of their students” (p. 96).

This article described a study where instructors and students from two different fields worked together to use video to train pre-service and veteran teachers.  They watched videos of teachers working with students who struggled with reading issues.  Those who watched it learned not only about teaching literacy, but about teaching those with disabilities.  Both the language arts and special education departments collaborated to provide videos, to watch said videos, and then, as groups, to discuss what was learned.  One result the authors gleaned was to provide better training for those viewing videos.  Observers need guiding questions and then time to reflect individually and collectively.  Results showed that 92 percent of the participants learned important skills to improve their own teaching, though the veteran teachers went deeper in their reflections than novice teachers, which was understandable (Hong & VanRiper, 2016).

A study such as this took the research in the field a new and valuable direction, from just watching videos and writing a reflection, to being trained to analyze more effectively, to sharing knowledge collectively, and to applying the knowledge to their own varied classrooms.  No research had been done that focused on all three aspects:  viewing one’s own teaching, viewing published authentic classrooms on video, and viewing other teachers’ at work, and then doing analysis with guidance and collaboration (Hong & VanRiper, 2016).

While the authors were excited to be taking research in this field to new places, they admitted that other questions need to be asked:  “Did the teacher candidates try the techniques they observed?  Were they able to modify and adapt the strategies they liked easily?…Was their application practical within the classroom setting?” (Hong & VanRiper, 2016, p. 106).  The need to look beyond college into the first job is the call here.  I would like to do that in my own research project.  I want to look at the use of training videos and their effects in practicum experiences, in the student teaching semester, and into the first job opportunity.  Teacher colleges such as the one I work for already collect data on this.  The data just need to be strengthened somewhat, organized, compared, and analyzed better to find results to these questions.

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